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Community Health Project
208 West 13th Street, 2nd floor
New York, NY 10011
(212) 675-3559
(212) 645-0013 (fax)

Community Health Project (CHP) is New York's only lesbian and gay health center. Founded in 1983 as a result of the merger of St. Mark's Community Clinic and the Gay Men's Health Project, two community-based STD clinics from the early 1970s, CHP provides low-cost, accessible, quality health care, primarily to New York City's lesbian and gay community, in all its diversity, regardless of any person's ability to pay for our services.

Today, with over 20 years of proven commitment to the lesbian and gay community, CHP's 36 paid staff and over 150 volunteers provide a wide range of medical and health-related services -- including comprehensive HIV/AIDS services -- to over 26,000 individuals. CHP's patients also include adolescents as well as bisexual and transgender men and women.

CHP is a precious community resource -- a safety net for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people. Many cannot afford private health care. But regardless of their financial status, patients choose to come to CHP for our innovative medical services and health-related programs that have been specifically and sensitively designed to meet their needs.

Today, with over 20 years of proven commitment to the lesbian and gay community, CHP's 36 paid staff and over 150 volunteers provide a wide range of medical staff and over 150 volunteers provide a wide range of medical lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people. Many cannot afford private health care. But regardless of their financial status, patients choose to come to CHP for our innovative medical services and health-related programs that been specifically and sensitively designed to meet their needs.

CHP knows first-hand the health concerns of lesbian and gay people, and advocates for our community's fair share of public and private health care funding. Most significantly, in 1994 CHP secured public financing through the Primary Care Development Corporation to develop a new, state-of-the-art primary care health center in the Chelsea/Village area. In September 1995, after a 10-year-long search, CHP purchased a six-story building on West 18th Street that will be come the new home of Community Health Project by Spring/Summer 1997.

Administrative Services

CHP's Administrative, Financial and Development Offices are located at 80 Eighth Avenue, Suite 1210, New York, NY 10011. The office is open Monday through Friday, from 9:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. and can be reached at (212) 675-3596.

Please note there is no email available at this time for CHP.

When you come down with a disease, it's difficult to understand if it is a great idea to continue exercising or to offer it a rest. The following are some ways to assist you know if you can overcome the symptoms, and to know if you need to simply remain in bed.

Care for your nose - A long time small signs will deceive us into thinking we can not run. Other times we are making excuses not to run. Although a runny, or stuffy nose can be a huge inconvenience, it shouldn't stop you from running. Many times, running can in fact clear up blockage. However, you can always use nasal wash, sprays, and decongestants. You can get these over the counter medications at your local drug shop.

Consume something hot - No, the heat doesn't do anything to clear up blockage and enhance air circulation in the air passages. Nevertheless, it does offer a psychologically soothing result. Occasionally all you have to do is fool your mind to obtain you out there running. At least, a cup of hot coffee or hot chocolate can get your body warmed and all set for the cold weather condition outside.

Downshift - When your sinuses are so busy and you are coughing up such a storm that you are losing lots of sleep, take a time off from tough exercises. Instead do moderate workouts of 30-45 minutes to assist get fresh immune cells in, and the dead waste and infection out. Do your exercises on an inside track. Now, do not do any running if you have a fever, or other symptoms of a flu (i.e. GI discomfort, sore joints, muscle pains). Make sure you are properly prepared. Having the best running belt can make a huge difference! Running can make it even worse, and can even pass the virus to your heart.

Last modified June 30, 2015 by Smart SEO Global